About

About Ginger Cand-e

 
Ginger Cand-eI’m a kandi kid from Houston, Texas who currently resides in Dayton, Ohio. I love spreading smiles wherever I go. I began making kandi the day before I went to my first rave. I had always been drawn to the brightly colored beads and the cheerful disposition of the kandi kids but at the time I had never met one. After my first party I was hooked.

I started my Ginger Cand-e YouTube channel because I saw there was need for teachers in the community. There were only a few people posting videos on YouTube at the time and I felt that I had enough understanding to share my knowledge with others. Over time it became more than just kandi. I began giving advice on how to rave safety which I am incredibly passionate about.

I’ve watched this community thrive and grow over time and I have to say I am extremely grateful to be a part of it. I love each and every one of you guys. It warms my heart to know that we can all make an impact on each other’s lives in such a positive way. Kandi has given me the opportunity to reach out to so many people and have lots of new experiences. It’s interesting to see how much one plastic bracelet can make an impact. But over and over again I see it changing lives for the better.

What is Kandi to me?

Trading Kandi

I see kandi as being necklaces, bracelets, cuffs, basic 3Ds, and miscellaneous small projects made by you, not purchased, to be traded at raves or with friends. They are most often made with pony beads, charms, letter beads, and toys.

I believe Kandi is traded or given away to symbolize the bond between two people, whether it be a new friendship, a new memory, or that moment in time. It has extreme sentimental value. This is why I believe kandi should not be sold.

I am reasonable and I do understand that sometimes it is impractical to make an equivalent trade with larger pieces of kandi. Bigger projects like backpacks, coats, armor, gas masks, etc. I believe do not qualify as kandi unless the creator says otherwise. At that point I believe it has a $0.00 value and can only be traded or given away. After you have called it kandi you should not sell it out of respect for other’s feelings.

Prices for beaded projects should be reasonable enough to cover materials, labor, and shipping. Please do not take advantage of people. We are a community and we must all work together.